Brazilian Challenge Day 85: HDs for BKFST

Even the finer dining establishments, like Restaurante Oscar at the Brasília Palace (where we stayed in Brasília) offer it on their breakfast buffet. It being hot dogs.

Yes, hot dogs pure and simple. Not breakfast sausage. Hot dogs.

I’d seen it almost everywhere. Finally, I gave in and decided to try it. Maybe there was something magical done to the hot dog at breakfast that makes it irresistible to miss on a Brazilian morning. It was sitting in a bit of a sauce.

And so I sliced into the manufactured meat hoping for an answer. It tasted like, well… a hot dog. Sure there was a slightly peppery oil around it, which fortunately or unfortunately didn’t take away from that hot dog taste.

Nope, the Brazilians didn’t win me over on this one. My opinion is still that hot dogs belong on buns covered in ketchup, mustard and pickle relish to drown out the taste.

The hot dog is simply a conduit to condiments. (Yes, even the ones on the breakfast buffet that are hidden in that pastry.)

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12 Responses to Brazilian Challenge Day 85: HDs for BKFST

  1. Ugh. This Challenge made me feel a little sick ;-).

  2. Jenner says:

    This is not Brazilian, I guess… I think some hotels offer hot dogs in the morning because they are cheap, easy to cook and supposedly give an international look to the breakfast. Many Brazilians think Americans eat hot dogs all the time! May be it’s a case of failed copycat, in which Brazilians try to mimic Americans without proper research..,

    • Andrew Francis says:

      I second that. It sounds like a lame attempt to provide “breakfast sausages” to international customers. BTW, who knew the words “breakfast” and “sausage” could be used in the same sentence (without a “not” in between)? 😉

    • If that is the case, that is quite hilarious. In America, hot dogs are for baseball games and picnics.
      I do remember being in Mexico and ordering a sausage pizza, only to receive a cheese pizza with hot dogs cut in half covering it. (I think they have the same pizza option here.)
      The hot dog… a misunderstood food.

      • Andrew Francis says:

        That sounds like another challenge for you: have a more typical hot dog in Sao Paulo. It’s often more than just a frankfurter on a bun (think double carbs) but it’s still a snack-type street food.

  3. anna says:

    I think its like people said here. brazilians dont eat that for breakfast but I have seen in some hotels too.

    I like hot dogs w batata palha , farofa , tomate sauce and corn. very brazilian hahaha
    (but not for breakfast!)

    • Oh yum. A hot dog with farofa!. But I love anything with farofa.
      Hilarious that the hot dogs are there to please the foreigners. I wonder which foreigners – definitely not the Americans. (Not even the kids, because they put it in a weird sauce, one kids will most likely not eat, at least not mine.)

  4. “I do remember being in Mexico and ordering a sausage pizza, only to receive a cheese pizza with hot dogs cut in half covering it.”
    LOL. Now is that a poorly executed culinary adaption, or just a scam?
    The sausage pizza exists in Brazil as well; but if the guy uses weiners instead of sausages he is ripping you off, intentionally.
    Useful vocab:
    Salsicha = Weiner (and the Brazilian name for Shaggy – from Scooby Doo)
    Sausage = Linguiça

  5. Fernando says:

    British people eat sausages in their breakfast… it might come from there.. I don´t quite know, but I would agree with you, it might be a failed atempt to get more international, tradicional colonial breakfast are much nicier!

    • Americans are big on breakfast sausages too. Thinking this is just one of those cultural misinterpretation. I remember going to Mexico years ago and ordering a sausage pizza, only to receive a pizza with sliced hot dogs on it.

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